Archive for January, 2014

Virus Increases Desire in Infected Crickets

6 January, 2014

See on Scoop.itVirology News

Love may be a battlefield, but most wouldn’t expect the fighters to be a parasitic virus and its cricket host.

Just like a common cold changes our behavior, sick crickets typically lose interest in everyday activities. But when Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie Univ. found her cricket colony decimated by a pathogen, she was shocked that the dying insects didn’t act sick. Not only had the infected crickets lost their usual starvation response, but they also continued to mate. A lot. How were the pathogen and the exuberant amorous behavior in the sick crickets connected?

Ed Rybicki‘s insight:

Sex zombie crickets…the mind boggles!

But it’s becoming increasingly obvious that, in insects at least, viruses can cause very significant behavioural alterations.  There are also tantalising hints that they MAY do the same in humans.

I see a burgeoning field of endeavour in our future.

See on www.laboratoryequipment.com

Researchers seek cure to herpes virus in horses

6 January, 2014

See on Scoop.itVirology News

For a human, developing a cold sore is a minor, if irritating, inconvenience. But if a horse contracts that same virus, it can mean a death sentence.

Researchers are hopeful that a chemical compound, derived from a micro-algae known as dinoflagellate, will successfully fight the virus in horses. The algae, isolated from sediments off the coast of Bermuda, are grown on-site at the MARBIONC culture facility, populating over time in large glass containers of liquid. They’re microscopic, visible to the naked eye only when populations are dense enough to change the color of the liquid. Once the algae are mature, researchers harvest the organisms and extract chemical compounds from individual samples, then isolate the compound containing the anti-viral activity.

Herpesvirus graphic from Russell Kightley Media

Ed Rybicki‘s insight:

I like that: using easily-cultured microalgae to make an antiviral compound.

Of course, they could go one step further: use said microalgae to make one of the viral antigens – like gD – to act as a vaccine.

Going green: the sensible thing to do.

See on www.jdnews.com

Oral cholera vaccine loaded with GMOs to be tested on babies worldwide [WARNING: B#LLSHIrT FOLLOWS]

4 January, 2014

See on Scoop.itVirology News

Oral cholera vaccine loaded with GMOs to be tested on babies worldwide

California-based vaccine manufacturer PaxVax has reportedly submitted an application to begin international trials of a novel oral cholera vaccine that contains live, genetically modified (GM) bacteria. VacTruth.com reports that the new vaccine is set to be tested on more than 1,000 individuals, many of whom are young children, in a three-part clinical trial series to take place throughout Australia.

In a recent application filing with the Australian Government, PaxVax makes plain its intent to administer the live, GM bacteria in both young and old and in every region of the country. Participants will be instructed to literally consume a cocktail of mercury-resistant, GM Shigella flexneri NR1 bacteria derived from the Vibrio cholera bacterial strain, which is recognized as the causative agent of the gastroenteritis disease known as cholera

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/043392_oral_vaccine_cholera_GMOs.html##ixzz2pRTUTjea

Ed Rybicki‘s insight:

OK, folks, here’s your Xmas-New Year-Solstice Festival challenge from ViroBlogy: the best point-by-point refutation of the claims made in this truly wonderful mixture of hype, taurine excreta and simple falsehoods, gets published in ViroBlogy – and gets a year’s free subscription.

OK, OK, ViroBlogy is free anyway – and I will in fact publish ANYTHING that authoritatively rubbishes this fruitloopery.

Several somethings, if I get them.

Go for it – and a happy 2014, all!

See on www.naturalnews.com