Archive for March 25th, 2012

Inflammatory effects of highly pathogenic H5N1 in… [J Neurosci. 2012] – PubMed – NCBI

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Here, we examined the effects of H5N1 on several pathological aspects affected in parkinsonism, including loss of the phenotype of dopaminergic neurons located in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), expression of monoamines and indolamines in brain, alterations in SNpc microglia number and morphology, and expression of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. We find that H5N1 induces a transient loss of the dopaminergic phenotype in SNpc and now report that this loss recovers by 90 d after infection. A similar pattern of loss and recovery was seen in monoamine levels of the basal ganglia….We conclude that H5N1 infection in mice induces a long-lasting inflammatory response in brain and may play a contributing factor in the development of pathologies in neurodegenerative disorders.

 

Via www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

The rationale for quadrivalent influenza vaccines

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Two antigenically distinct lineages of influenza B viruses have circulated globally since 1985.  However, licensed trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines contain antigens from only a single influenza B virus and thus provide limited immunity against circulating influenza B strains of the lineage not present in the vaccine. In recent years, predictions about which B lineage will predominate in an upcoming influenza season have been no better than chance alone, correct in only 5 of the 10 seasons from 2001 to 2011. Consequently, seasonal influenza vaccines could be improved by inclusion of influenza B strains of both lineages. The resulting quadrivalent influenza vaccines would allow influenza vaccination campaigns to respond more effectively to current global influenza epidemiology.

 

Influenza vaccine graphic courtesy Russell Kightley Media

Via www.landesbioscience.com

Rotavirus vaccine can save millions of children’s lives in developing countries

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea-related morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. The virus is transmitted through feco-oral route. Its incubation period is about two days.

 

Rotavirus graphic courtesy Russell Kightley Media

Via www.landesbioscience.com

HIV Replication 3D Medical Animation | Your Complete Source For Cardiology Articles | Cardiology Corner

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

An interesting, but not completely accurate animated account of HIV-1 particle entry and genome replication.

 

Spot the mistakes for a chance to contribute to Virology News…B-)

Via cardiologycorner.net

For Cedars-Sinai’s 1980s HIV babies, a diagnosis for life

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

They belong to a club that no one else will ever join. Its numbers are dropping and notoriety is fading, and they risk becoming little more than a footnote in the history of the AIDS crisis.

Via www.latimes.com

The vaccines that bring hope to the children of Africa

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Immunisation is one of the most cost-effective health investments. It has eradicated smallpox, reduced the global incidence of polio by 99 per cent, and decreased many other causes of illness and death. More children than ever before are being reached with immunisation. In 2009, an estimated 107 million children under the age of one were vaccinated with three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine.

 

And in the developed world, people are turning away from vaccines.  Idiots…it has already happened that travellers TO developed countries have brought vaccine-preventable diseases back to developing countries where they had been eradicated.

Via www.independent.co.uk

Polio vaccine creator Victor J. Cabasso dies

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Dr. Victor J. Cabasso, a pioneer virologist and immunologist who worked on creating the polio vaccine and other vaccines against human and animal virus diseases, died Feb. 28 at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Walnut Creek. He was 96.

In his earliest days in America he became noted for his experiments in developing the altered live polio viruses that led to the live virus vaccine now widely used around the world.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/03/22/BA8V1NIJKT.DTL#ixzz1q7fRoUqy

 

Poliovirus image courtesy of Russell Kightely Media

Via www.sfgate.com

H5N1 Pandemic Information News: Cold-adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza live vaccine elicits cross-reactive immune responses against seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses

25 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

The rapid transmission of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus (pH1N1) among humans has raised the concern of a potential emergence of reassortment between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic influenza strains, especially the avian H5N1 influenza. Here, we report that the cold-adapted pH1N1 live attenuated vaccine (CApH1N1) elicits cross-reactive immunity against seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses in the mouse model. Immunization with CApH1N1 induced both systemic and mucosal antibodies with broad reactivity to seasonal and H5 strains including HAPI H5N1 and the avian H5N2 virus, providing a complete protection against heterologous and hetero-subtypic lethal challenges. Our results not only accentuate the merit of using live attenuated influenza vaccines in view of cross-reactivity, but also represent the potential of CApH1N1 live vaccine for mitigating the clinical severity that arises from reassortant viruses between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic H5 subtype viruses.

 

Interesting…maybe because the live attenuated vaccine elicits both humoral and cell-medidated immunity, and to more than just envelope glycoproteins?

Via pandemicinformationnews.blogspot.fr