Archive for March 28th, 2012

Early temporary treatment for HIV can delay the time to long-term treatment – EurekAlert (press release)

28 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Early temporary treatment for HIV can delay the time to long-term treatmentEurekAlert (press release)A study in this week’s PLoS Medicine suggests that when people are first infected with HIV (primary HIV infection), temporary treatment with antiretroviral…

Via www.eurekalert.org

Sky News: New HPV vaccine to treat infection

28 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

He developed a vaccine used worldwide to prevent cervical cancer.

Now the Australian scientist behind that pivotal technology is developing a second vaccine to tackle the human papillomavirus (HPV) which, if successful, could further reduce rates of the aggressive cancer.

Professor Ian Frazer, who was named Australian of the Year in 2006 for developing the groundbreaking vaccine, is working with Brisbane-based biotechnology company Coridon on the new inoculation.

The Gardasil and Cervarix vaccines, which are currently available free for 12 and 13-year-old girls, prevent infection with the cancer-causing HPV virus.

The new vaccine will treat people already infected with the virus, to stop the infection leading to cancer, Prof Frazer said.

Via www.skynews.com.au

HPV Vaccine May Help Women With Cervical Conditions

28 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

TUESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) — A new study finds that women diagnosed with pre-cancerous cervical conditions after they get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine can still benefit from the shot because it cuts their risk of futureHPV-related cervical disease.”This study helps to clarify the effects of the HPV vaccine and further define its use,” noted one expert, Dr. Elizabeth Poynor, a gynecologic oncologist and pelvic surgeon at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Via health.yahoo.net

Anti-insect wheat trials underway

28 March, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

The first experiments with plants genetically-modified to repel aphids are under way in the UK.  Wheat has been engineered with a gene from a peppermint plant so that it emits a particular pheromone.

The smell is the alarm signal given off by aphids to warn of an attack by predators.

The researchers hope that this will act as a “no parking sign” to keep the pests at bay without needing insecticide.

This is the first trial of a plant deliberately modified to use pheromones to ward off pests.

The work is taking place at Rothamsted Research, the plant science centre in Hertfordshire

 

Nice place, Rothamsted: and aphids transmit viruses, so it’s right for this site.  Sort of.

Via www.bbc.co.uk