Archive for April 13th, 2012

NMAH | Polio: Two Vaccines

13 April, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

This site explores the history of polio, the science and philanthropy behind the vaccines, the experiences of people who contracted polio and their influence on American culture, and current global efforts at stopping transmission of the poliovirus.

 

Vaccine denialists really, really need to go and have a look at this…15 000 kids paralysed and 1000 died per year in teh USA in the mid-1950s.  And now parents don’t want to vaccinate.

Via americanhistory.si.edu

The Birth of Polio Eradication: The Salk Vaccine Turns 57

13 April, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

On April 12, 1955, scientists and reporters gathered in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for a momentous event. Millions of Americans huddled around radios and televisions that day to learn whether the world’s first polio vaccine, developed by Dr. Jonas Salk at the University of Pittsburgh, could prevent a devastating disease that killed and paralyzed thousands upon thousands of people, mainly children.

It’s hard to overstate the terror of polio back then. It would arrive each summer, like clockwork, leaving behind vivid reminders for all to see: wheelchairs, crutches, leg braces, iron lungs, deformed limbs. When Dr. Salk’s injectable vaccine was declared “safe, effective, and potent” that remarkable day in Ann Arbor, a nation celebrated. In churches, department stores, and coffee shops people wept openly with relief. President Eisenhower invited Dr. Salk to the White House where, in a trembling voice, he thanked the young researcher for saving children everywhere.

Via www.impatientoptimists.org

Can stem cells cure HIV?

13 April, 2012

Via Scoop.itVirology News

Because they are rich in stem cells, the cord blood of babies is being stored in blood banks, fueling a growing industry. Human stem cells, after all, have been credited with vast medical powers.

But can stem cells be used to cure one of the major scourges of the modern age: HIV-AIDS?

A series of studies conducted by researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) suggest that this might indeed be possible. In the most recent study, published on April 12 in the journal PLoS Pathogens, the researchers demonstrated that these stem cells can actually attack HIV-infected cells in a living organism.

 

Nice account of an interesting topic.

Via www.rappler.com